Casa Valentina

Casa Valentina

Click to enlargePatrick Page as Valentina in CASA VALENTINA

Patrick Page as Valentina in CASA VALENTINA

Patrick Page, Reed Birney and Nick Westrate in CASA VALENTINA

Mare Winningham & Patrick Page in CASA VALENTINA

The company of CASA VALENTINA

The company of CASA VALENTINA

Mare Winningham & Patrick Page in CASA VALENTINA

Patrick Page, Reed Birney, Nick Westrate, John Cullum and Larry Pine in CASA VALENTINA

The company of CASA VALENTINA

The company of CASA VALENTINA

The company of CASA VALENTINA on Opening Night

Mare Winningham & Patrick Page on Opening Night

Feature Articles


“The ensemble cast, directed with absolute confidence by Joe Mantello, is in rare form, especially Patrick Page, who plays the uneasily married owner of the Chevalier d’Eon (Mare Winningham, cast as his long-suffering wife, runs him a close second). A classical actor with a bass voice of matchless magnificence, Mr. Page effortlessly plumbs the deep-seated sorrow in his character, who pretends to be at ease in his doubleness but finally admits with anguish that ‘I want to be normal,’a statement that he—and we—know to be less simple than it sounds.”

– The Wall Street Journal

“Expertly embodied by a cast led by Patrick Page and Reed Birney”

– The New York Times

“A resonant Patrick Page masterfully depicts George/Valentina, who runs the colony with the help of his incredibly understanding wife whom Mare Winningham portrays so warmly.”

– New Jersey Star-Ledger

“Patrick Page is rock solid as George/Valentina”

– The New York Daily News

“There is no first among equals here — Birney, Cullum, Ebert, McGowan, Page, Pine and Westrate all get into their wigs, frocks and make-up with consummate skill.”

– The Huffington Post

“Page, a tall, imposing actor who has made a name for himself playing a series of stage villains, would at first seem like a better fit as the snakelike Charlotte. But Page is very moving, if a bit stiff, as George, who, whether in his female guise as Valentina or not, feels like someone with the weight of the world on his shoulders.”

– Theatremania

“Patrick Page and Mare Winningham have a poignant rapport as George/Valentina and his wife, Rita, who supports her husband ardently but becomes increasingly aware of her own needs.”

– USA Today

“Page absolutely convinces as both the husband and the woman who doesn’t need one; there’s no question who he (or she) is or should be.”

– Talkin’ Broadway

“There’s sterling work from Page, Winningham and Pine in key roles…”

– Hollywood Reporter

“All have a couple of revelatory moments that allow them to shine, but the standout performances belong to Page and Ebert.”

– Cititour

“An enviable group of New York’s finest male actors. The list ranges from the venerable 84-year-old John Cullum and contemporary greats like Reed Birney, Patrick Page, and Larry Pine, to the new generation, Gabriel Ebert and Nick Westrate.”

– Theatremania

“A superb ensemble cast. Patrick Page and Mare Winningham have a poignant rapport as George/Valentina and his wife, Rita.”

– USA Today

“Flawless performances”

– Entertainment Weekly

“Fierstein is blessed to have a world class cast including Patrick Page lending his magnificent voice to both George and Valentina.”

– Curtain Up

“The season’s most distinct and richly textured performances…. Mare Winningham’s Rita and Patrick Page’s George/Valentina both create a natural, realistic portrayal of a troubled but loving married couple.”

– Stagezine

“Patrick Page as George/Valentina pours a complex cocktail of hyper-masculinity, odd naivety, and a downright sexuality.”

– The Broadway Blog

“Patrick Page plays George/Valentina with great sincerity and passion. His longing for normalcy is tangible and something we can all relate to.”

– Theatre That Matters

“The actors, however, take risks that pay off magnificently, beginning with Patrick Page in the enigmatic titular role. George is a tempestuous, trapped man. Valentina gives him the release he requires to get through another day as George. Page handles this with just the proper amount of frustration and elation.”

– Edge Boston